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It’s Tick Season Again!

As the weather warms up and we all spend more time outside enjoying our yards and gardens, be on the look out for ticks!

Ticks carry a variety of diseases, including Lyme’s disease. It’s a bacterial infection spread by tick bites, especially if the tick has been attached for more than 24 hours. Remember, check yourself and your wee ones for ticks when you come back inside every day! It really makes a difference.

These black-legged ticks, Ixodes scapularis, a...

These black-legged ticks, Ixodes scapularis, are found on a wide range of hosts including mammals, birds and reptiles. Black-legged ticks, I. scapularis are known to transmit Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi, to humans and animals during feeding, when they insert their mouth parts into the skin of a host, and slowly take in the nutrient-rich host blood. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This article popped up on my Facebook newsfeed: Lyme Disease: Signs, Treatment and Prevention – NBC29 WVIR Charlottesville, VA News, Sports and Weather. 🙂 It inspired me to write about this topic!

Lyme disease is becoming more prevalent among tick-borne diseases. Please do yourself and your loved ones a favor and be vigilant about checking for ticks! Also, if you find a tick, be sure you remove the tick in its entirety–including the head. Some redness is normal, but a ring or bullseye that forms around the bite should be checked out.

Other syptoms of Lyme’s disease include fever, chills, fatigue, and headaches. If you feel like you’re catching the flu, it might be a good idea to look for ticks and head to the doctor for a checkup. Lyme’s disease can have life-long consequences if it’s not treated early!

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Here at my farm, we have TONS of ticks! I check myself, my kids, and my animals daily for ticks. Have you seen any ticks yet this year?

Iliotibial Band Syndrome = No fun!

Remember a few months ago when I posted about my bum knee? Well, I wanted to share the cause of my problem. Hopefully some of this information can help another person experiencing knee pain!

I found some great information at the link below. Check it out!

Iliotibial Band – A common source of hip and/or knee pain.

My pain was caused by ITB Syndrome. It’s often associated with runners, but apparently horseback riding and even walking can cause it. Basically, it’s an overuse injury. The pain can be excruciating.

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The IT Band is illustrated in red                                        (Photo credit: fickleandfreckled)

A few weeks ago, the knee pain finally subsided (it only took 4 months). I wasn’t very happy when it was soon replaced with hip pain on the other end of the iliotibial band. Apparently the inflammation can occur at both joints it connects to. Thankfully they don’t both hurt at the same time!

I’ve been doing a lot of reading up on stretching and strengthening exercises. Once the inflammation starts to go down (this can take quite a bit of time), you can work on relaxing the IT band with stretches. The condition can also be treated by strengthening surrounding muscles. ITB Syndrome is often caused by muscle imbalances in the legs.

I’m going to try to post something soon that illustrates the different stretches you can try to relieve IT band tightness. I’ve also found that massage works great! My wonderful husband has spent many evenings trying to massage the tension out. He’s the best! ❤

ITB Syndrome can also be caused by a gait disorder. I’m not sure what caused mine, but I’m going to do my best to stretch and strengthen my leg back into condition.

Do you have ITB Syndrome? What have you done to relieve the pain and tension?

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