Blood Evidence from People

Blood samples, right: freshly drawn; left: tre...

Image via Wikipedia

It is important to know how to collect blood evidence properly. Law enforcement personnel and their affiliates know this and understand how important it is!

If you read the article about collecting blood evidence from a crime scene, you should also consider reading this one: How to Collect Blood Evidence From People | Socyberty.

Blood evidence can be collected from the crime scene, a suspect, victim, or decedent. When collecting blood from a crime scene it is important to collect a sufficiently sized sample and a control swab. The sample must be allowed to dry completely before being packaged in a breathable container.

Collecting blood from a person (alive or dead) takes a bit more experience. Blood may be drawn from a living subject by authorized personnel only. The medical examiner may collect blood from deceased individuals during autopsy.

Pictured to the right are two blood samples. The one on the right has been treated with an anticoagulant known as EDTA while the sample on the left is an untreated sample that has separated.

Whether blood is collected from the crime scene or from a person it is equally important evidence. It must be carefully collected and entered into the chain of custody to protect the integrity of the evidence.

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About Genevieve

Genevieve is a southern gal who loves to write. She is a graduate of Everest College with an AAS in Criminal Investigations. Currently, she works as a freelance writer and volunteers for Central Virginia Horse Rescue by writing their monthly newsletter. If she's not writing, you can bet she's either spending time with friends and family, playing with the horses, crafting, or reading. Interested in having a guest blog appearance? Email sunshineleo05@gmail.com to get in touch! P.S. Subscribe by RSS feed if you are interested in following her creative insanity... ;)

Posted on December 9, 2011, in Forensics and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

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